SMU Law Students Develop Innovative Legal Apps

SMU Law Students Develop Innovative Legal Apps

Thursday, Jan. 18, at noon at SMU Dedman School of Law:

SMU LAW STUDENTS TO SHOWCASE INNOVATIVE NEW APPS DESIGNED TO HELP DFW COMMUNITY NAVIGATE LEGAL ISSUES

Students developed apps with legal aid-organizations for new tech-focused class
 
DALLAS (SMU) – As a result of SMU Dedman School of Law’s new course, “Technology, Innovation and Law: Designing Legal Apps,” several new consumer-friendly software apps –designed by Dedman Law students with input from regional legal-aid groups – will be  showcased at a free public event Thursday, Jan. 18, at noon in Florence Hall Room 201.
 
Members of the public interested in attending the lunchtime event should email TsaiCenter@smu.edu by Weds., Jan. 17. Media members wishing to cover the interactive presentations should contact Lynn Dempsey at 214-768-8617 or ldempsey@smu.edu to confirm parking and other details.
 
To create the software applications, three teams of SMU Dedman Law students collaborated with fall 2017 legal-aid partners Texas Appleseed, Force for Immigrant Rights and Empowerment, and the Judge Elmo B. Hunter Legal Center for Victims of Crimes Against Women to provide resources to address the most common legal issues faced by the communities each group serves.
 
Each student team will demonstrate how each app concept works and the value it could offer.
 
“This course has been one of the most rewarding things I have done as a lawyer,” said Associate Professor W. Keith Robinson, co-director of the Tsai Center for Law, Science and Innovation, which developed and guided the new class. “Not only do students get to learn a marketable technology skill, but these apps will allow legal-aid organizations to provide their clients with better services.”
  
“The initiative and its valuable partnerships “benefit everyone involved,” said Jennifer Collins, Dean of SMU Dedman School of Law. “Students learn how to use technology in innovative ways to solve complex legal problems, legal aid groups can reduce cost and improve outcomes, and the law school can help underserved communities access the legal assistance they so desperately need.”
 
Read more on this from Texas Lawyer.
 
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